Edy Kizaki

Seattle Kids’ Activities – cheat sheet

February 1, 2011 in Ballard, Fremont, Green Lake, Greenwood/Phinney Ridge, Magnolia, Markets, Montlake, Museums, Queen Anne, Seattle for Kids, Wallingford, West Seattle

We’ll be adding information and links, but here are a lot of resources in a quick cheat sheet format.  If you are looking for kids’ activities in Seattle including sightseeing and fun, even a few kid-friendly restaurants, here is our A-List!  We love living in this city and my 9 year old Daniel and I never run out of great things to do…just time!!  We want you to know how great the city is and look forward to coming here.  Or if you live here, please share your favorties with me too!  The Comments is open, folks!

A book I recommend is Seattle Mama’s Handbook, here is a review I did: Edy’s blog on  Books on Seattle, including Seattle Mama Handbook, also here’s A Good Book for Relocating.

Links I Like for Kids in Seattle:

http://familyfun.go.com/vacations/destinations/pacific-states-vacations/washington-vacations/seattle-a-natural-urban-getaway-712335/ Seattle for Kids

http://familyfun.go.com/vacations/the-tropics-near-seattles-space-needle-713133/ Butterfly Garden at the Space Needle…it’s in the Pacific Science Center

for fun, check out the Space Needle webcam!

City of Seattle Self-Guided Walking Tours

City of Seattle History and Culture of Seattle

Good site for Seattle Festivals

A Good List of Seattle Kid’s activiites and interesting spots includes:

Alki Beach (in summer though, but has a nice prominade if it’s a sunny day, or fly a kite if it’s windy) and famous Salty’s Restaurant at Alki (West Seattle)
Alki Kayak Tours (West Seattle, on Alki…open weekends starting in March)
Seattle Aquarium (on Alaskan Way, Seattle Waterfront)
Aqua Verde Cafe and Paddle Club (on Lake Washington, U District…kayak rentals and guided tours)
Bainbridge Island Day Trip…we love the Ferry ride to Bainbridge, and you can get off, walk around, have lunch, shop and explore, even stay till dinner ( take the Ferry from near the Aquarium on Alaskan Way)
Ballard Locks (Ballard)
Benaroya Hall Garden of Remembrance
Boat Ride in Puget Sound (sailing or cruise),
Boeing Museum of Flight (south and west of Qwest Field)
Seattle Bug Safari Bug Zoo (near Pike Place Market)
Burke Gillman Trail (goes all the way from Sammamish to Ballard…ride bikes?!  rollerblade??!!)
Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture (near UW)

Bus “Free Ride” Area in Seattle
Cal Anderson Park
(for smaller kids?)
Carkeek Park (has Environmental Learning Center)
Center for Wooden Boats, Lake Union (Eastlake)
Discovery Park (Magnolia)  This is the city’s largest park with over 11 miles of trails for walking, including on the Sound (go over the train tracks)

Experience Music Project & SciFi Museum, (back at Seattle Center) it’s great!!! Good cafe for lunch, too
Fremont Troll (and Rocket, and the Cut with Dinosaur Hedges Topiary),
Japanese Garden at the UW Arboretum
and another, Kubota Garden in South Seattle
Fisherman’s Terminal (Interlake/Magnolia)

Gasworks Park to climb and fly kites, good for long or short visit, also arrive early to get a place for fireworks July 4 and New Year’s Eve (Wallingford on Lake Union)
Golden Gardens Park (Ballard)
Green Lake is a 3 mile walk around the lake which is always a great activity, and there is a playground to run around (in the Green Lake neighborhood which also has tennis courts, sports fields, kayak lessons, and some well-know casual dining, or Duke’s Chowder House for a slightly more formal meal with 4 award-winning chowders and good fish) and kids’ menu).
Harbor Steps, Seattle (near SAM, the Art Museum)
International District Attractions
Klondike Gold Rush Park & Museum (downtown Seattle)

Log House Museum (West Seattle)  Birthplace of Seattle, roots & heritage of Native Americans
Matthews Beach Park (summer swimming…north of U District on Lake Washington)
Molly Moon’s ice cream/frozen custard shop in Capitol Hill (or try Peaks or Old School)
Monorail (downtown to Seattle Center)
Mt. Baker Park (Mt. Baker looking toward Bellevue on Lake Washington, has swimming)
Mount Baker Sailing and Rowing Center (on Lake Washington)
Museum of History and Industry (on Lake Washington in Montlake/U Dist)
Myrtle Edwards Park (Elliot Bay next to Olympic Sculpture Garden, great views of bay and Olympics)
Nordic Heritage Museum (Ballard)
Northwest Puppet Center (Maple Leaf north of the U District)
Olympic Sculpture Park (Elliot Bay)
Orca Whale Watching tour (San Juans)
Original Starbucks (at Pike Place Market)
Pacific Science Center (Seattle Center)
Pike Place Market,
Pioneer Square
Qwest Field Tour (near Alaskan Way…home to Seattle Seahawks)
SAFECO Field Tour (near Qwest Field…home to Seattle Mariners)
Salty’s Restaurant at Alki
School of Acrobatics and New Circus Acts (Georgetown)  video
Seattle Art Museum (SAM, above Alaskan Way)
Seattle Center
Seattle Center Skatepark
Seattle Central Library (amazing building, downtown)
Seattle Children’s Museum (it’s for younger kids, but Daniel still likes it, some fun computerized and art stuff, in Seattle Center)
Seattle Center House events,
Seattle Glass Blowing Studio (near Seattle Center)
Seattle Outdoor Markets (neighborhoods, some open year round, others are seasonal)
Smith Tower (8 blocks south of Pike Place Market in Free Ride zone)
Sno Parks for Snowmobiling (Washington)
Space Needle (you can eat at the Sky City restaurant on top, Dave and I did it for brunch, it’s great, revolves slowly and food was good!),

Theo Chocolate Factory Tour (need reservations, I did a blog on this once, will try to find it…it’s in Fremont)
Underground Tour (Pioneer Sqaure)
UW Arboretum also has great Family Programs
Vertical World Rock Climbing Gym (in Queen Ann down around Nickerson…also new facility being planned for 2011)
Volunteer Park Conservatory (Capitol Hill)
Waterfall Garden (Pioneer Square…secluded and beloved)
Wing Luke Museum (“The Wing”), International District
Woodland Park Zoo even though sometimes the animals hide, it is a good example of a modern, “green” zoo where the animals’ comfort is considered over that of the visitors, and has a cool parrot house where you can hold and or feed the birds, and a variety of exhibits…also a great indoor run/climb/play area which will be less crowded in the weekdays.  (Phinney Ridge, near Green Lake and Fremont)
World Spice (you like to cook, right?  kids can explore and sniff, you can stock up…)
Ye Olde Curiosity Shop (near Acquarium on Alaskan Way)

All the Best,

Edy

Edy Kizaki

Edy Kizaki
Broker – Realtor®
Direct: 206.249.2914

eXp Realty
206-902-4371 fax
www.seattlecentric.com

edy@seattecentric.com

Green Lake

September 14, 2010 in Green Lake, Seattle Communities

Green Lake is a lake (usually more blue or gray than green, but certainly surrounded by lovely green trees and grass) set in the middle of Green Lake Park, which is surrounded by Green Lake neighborhood, one of the most beloved treasures of Seattle.  Kayaking, running and jogging, roller blading, biking, walking, dog strolling, baby strolling, and combinations of all of the above abound.  Not to mention the tennis, rugby, picnic areas, playground, basket ball courts, and coffee shops and eateries that dot the north end of the Green Lake area.

Green Lake used to be half an hour away from Seattle and in fact it is where many prominent Seattlites had a summer vacation home where Mother and the children would stay while Father worked in the city and “came up to the Lake” on the weekends.  Now in high demand as a walkable residential district, there are both grand view homes, high end condos, lovely stately craftsmen built 100 years ago as well as brand new modern eclectics which have the atmosphere of the craftsmen of yesteryear and preserve the air of history so prevalent.  Add to all this the proximity of Phinney Ridge, Greenwood and Ballard to the west and the U District to the east, and Woodland Park Zoo close by, and just south Fremont and Queen Anne, and there could not be a more convenient yet laid back residential district in all of the city.  Prices do tend to be higher than most other popular neighborhoods because it’s so close to I-5 for commuting and there are less residences in the neighborhood than in some larger areas, with high demand.